Residual Functional Capacity and Mental Disorders

Posted on December 22, 2011 by cjblog

If you apply for Social Security disability benefits because of a mental impairment, the Social Security Administration will evaluate your mental “residual functional capacity” (RFC). Mental RFC is your ability to perform basic work-related activities, despite the limitations caused by your mental impairment.

If you have experienced a significant loss of ability to perform basic work-related, mental activities, you may qualify for disability benefits.

To be capable of performing paid unskilled work, you need to be able to:
• Understand, remember, and follow simple instructions.
• Make simple work-related decisions.
• Respond appropriately to supervisors and co-workers, typical work situations; and changes in the work routine.

Your claim for disability benefits may have been denied erroneously because the SSA incorrectly assessed your mental RFC. In that case, you must be prepared to testify at your hearing about your inability to perform these activities to convince the Administrative Law Judge that your ability to work is more restricted than the SSA initially determined it to be.

You may be asked about whether you can remember and follow work-related procedures and maintain your concentration over an extended period of time. You could be asked whether you have been able to arrive at work on time and stick to a schedule. Also important are your ability to work at a reasonable pace and to ask for instructions and help when you need it.

If your case involves a mental disorder, an experienced Ocala disability lawyer can help you prove your limited ability to work. Please contact at the CJ Henry Law Firm at (352) 304-5300 if you would like to schedule a time to talk.

This entry was posted in Disability Claims, Mental Disorder, Tips by cjblog.